2020 Early Action Update

  David Graves      November 1st, 2019

This morning the UGA Admissions Office announced that our Early Action decision release date would be Friday, November 22 in the late afternoon. If you have been following my blog for a while, you will know not to ask when late afternoon is, as I cannot give you an exact time. In the lead up to the decisions going out in three weeks, here is some data about this year’s Early Action application group.   Total EA Applications: 16,494 (submitted and app fee paid) roughly identical to last year’s EA applicant pool. Complete Early Action Applications as of today: 16,100 98% are complete right now, very impressive EA Applicants Applying within 3 days of Deadline: 8,659 Wow, just wow Total number of EA Applicants using Coalition App: 5,300 We are fine with either application source (in-house app or Coalition) Residency data on EA apps: 52% in-state, 48% out-of-state/intl We do not make different decisions based on residency, but it is an interesting data point as we saw a large jump in out-of-state apps last year. Most common majors: Biology – 1,672 applicants, Undecided Business – 1,459 We do not make different decisions based on major, but it is always interesting to see the different academic interests of our applicants. As you can see, a huge number of the Early Action applications are complete. Only 2% of our applicants are incomplete, with most missing official test scores. We will be shutting down the importing of test scores and documents very soon, so make […]

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The Holistic Review Process-Beyond the Numbers

  David Graves      December 12th, 2017

It is December, which means our holistic file reading process will begin soon. Instead of giving you a nice “slice of life” story which then transitions into our reason for reading files, I will just go straight into the process (except for the Rudy clip). For a large group of our applicants (ones who are not admitted based on their academics alone in November and February), we spend almost three months diving into everything in a student’s application to better understand them, look at them in comparison with the rest of the applicant pool, and ultimately make final decisions about our freshman class. I have had a number of comments on the blog asking what we look at in this process, so here are the areas we look at in our holistic review. I could probably write six pages worth of explanation about the process, but I have summarized each area to lessen the pain of exhaustion for the reader. There is more to our review process than just these brief descriptions though, but at least this gives you some details of the process. Activities/Involvement/Leadership – The first thing you should know about activities is that we value quality over quantity. What we are looking for is somewhat about the range of what a person does, but more so the depth of their involvement. It is not about how many clubs/sports/activities you can join, but instead looking at is what things you have committed to during your high school years, both […]

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The Importance of Depth

  David Graves      January 31st, 2017

For the last fifteen years or so, my family has made an intentional decision to try and have birthday events and gifts be focused on an activity. We have planned scavenger hunts, rafter down several Tennessee rivers, hit the ski slopes in West Virginia, and gone cave spelunking in Kentucky. I vividly remember a trip early on where we went tubing down the Chattahoochee in Helen, GA. For those who don’t know what tubing is, it is the outdoor version of a lazy river, and Helen is a wonderful location for this adventure. You park at the tubing center, catch a quick bus ride (with your inner tube and life vest) up river, then have a relaxing float downstream. Unfortunately, during this middle of the summer tubing adventure, a problem arose: a drought that year meant the water level in the river was precariously low. In reality, nothing revolving around tubing is precarious. The worst that can possibly happen is generally a mild sunburn or floating a little too far away from your family. But a low level of water means less effortless floating and more standing, walking, pushing, and annoyance. It also means more complaining by family members, which becomes a downward spiral. Water depth (along with bug spray and sunscreen) is key to a good tubing adventure. Good water depth provides a smooth, consistent trip down the river. In the same vein, depth is key in reading admissions files. When we are reading applications, we are looking at […]

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Said No Admission Counselor Ever-2016 Version

  David Graves      August 20th, 2015

In the UGA Admissions Office, there are some things we will never say no matter what. Some people will ask questions hoping for one of these answers, but you will not hear us give an answer (at least not the one some people expect). I sometimes feel like Dr. Seuss in “Green Eggs and Ham”, (paraphrasing) “I will not say that in a house, I will not say that with a mouse. I will not say that here or there, I will not say that anywhere.” Here are some of the top things we would never say: “Sure, go ahead and cut back on your academic schedule so that you can add another activity.” Academics come first. Let me repeat, academics come first. If you are struggling with being overloaded, I suggest looking at cutting back on an extra-curricular activity, not academics. You will thank us sometime during your first semester in college. “Yes, you should completely trust the information your neighbors, friends, and online college forum people give you about college admissions.” While there are a number of well meaning people who want to help you with the college admission process, most of them do not have a background in the admissions process. Just because I had the transmission changed in my car does not make me an expert how to do this mechanically. While many people have gone through the admissions process, they are not reading files, analyzing enrollment data, reading essays, etc. They might have knowledge about […]

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File Reading Part II – Academics and Strength of Curriculum

  David Graves      December 1st, 2014

From January through mid-March, the admissions staff will hide out in our offices and read files during our holistic file reading process. There are six main areas that we look at in our file reading process, and this post covers the second two areas, focusing on a student’s academics and the strength of curriculum. While we look at these sections in our initial review of applications, we now look at them in much more detail. Academic Review When we look at a student’s transcript during the holistic review process, we are trying to understand how a student has progressed over their 3+ years in high school. Have they been consistently strong throughout the years, did they start slow and then jump up to all A’s, did they have a tough time in a specific subject, are all their B’s low or high B’s, etc. We then use this in combination with the other factors impacting their life, from family issues that occurred where we saw a dip in grades to how a student did once they got into a specific AP course. If a student made a D in Geometry in 10th grade, did they bounce back from it or keep on a downward trend. If there is a downward trend or low grade, we also want to know if there were any mitigating circumstances that led to this issue. All of these factors help us understand the overall picture that the transcript gives us. Three quick warnings/notes on grades: […]

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First Year Academic Merit Scholarships Awarded

  David Graves      April 23rd, 2013

 Over the last several weeks the Admissions staff has carefully reviewed all our newly admitted First Year students to consider them for University of Georgia academic merit scholarships.  (See the list and our discussion of merit and need-based aid at our website, https://admissions.uga.edu/article/scholarships-at-uga.html.)  Virtually all scholarships available through Admissions have now been awarded, and we have contacted each of the recipients. At UGA, academic merit scholarships have become increasingly competitive.  This is mainly due to the limited funding we have for these awards and the high number of extremely capable students who now gain University of Georgia admission.  Nonetheless, we have somewhat increased the total number of these scholarships this year.  For example, this year we inaugurated the Classic Scholarships which are offered to academically superior out-of-state first year students.    At this point, if you have not received notice that you have an academic merit scholarship to attend UGA, it is highly unlikely you will receive an offer of one from us in Admissions.  We are still finalizing a literal handful of specialized scholarships attached to very specific guidelines set by the generous donors who provide their funding.  You can see if you have been awarded a UGA scholarship by checking your online application Status Check.   Also, some UGA academic departments may also be awarding some scholarships which will not be reflected in the Status Check. If you have been selected for any of our Academic Merit awards, congratulations!  Please be sure to read your offer letter carefully.  Keep it […]

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